Criminology Courses

Criminology (CRM) courses

  • CRM 641 Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice

    An overview of research design as applied to research on crime and justice. Topics include hypothesis formulation, sampling techniques, reliability and validity, survey construction, field observation, and evaluation research. May be taught concurrently with CRM 340. Cannot receive credit for both CRM 641 and CRM 340.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • CRM 657 Forensic Psychology: Child Abuse and the Law

    Study of the legal issues related to child abuse and exploitation. Students will gain an understanding of the law pertaining to child cases and how interactions with children can bolster or diminish the quality of children's memory report as seen by the judicial system. The Greene County Prosecutor's Office will participate in the design of this course, thus the specific legal issues discussed will remain current and may change based on the needs of the community. Identical with PSY 657. Cannot receive credit for both CRM 657 and PSY 657.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 697 Special Topics and Issues in Criminal Justice

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    A variable topic course examining issues of crime, its causes, as well as social and political responses to crime by various institutions including government, media, law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Variable content course. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours if the topic changes. May be taught concurrently with CRM 597. Cannot receive credit for both CRM 597 and CRM 697 unless topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • CRM 701 Criminal Justice Policy

    Prerequisite: admission to the MS in Criminology and Criminal Justice; or Criminal Justice Leadership and Management certificate program; or Master of Professional Studies program with the Criminal Justice option.

    This course takes a critical look at the construction, implementation, evaluation, and justification of a wide range of criminal justice policies and programs. Significant attention is given to methodological processes in determining policy and program effectiveness.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • CRM 705 Applied Research in Criminal Justice

    Prerequisite: admission to the MS in Criminology and Criminal Justice program and successful completion of an undergraduate or graduate research methods course.

    This course provides students with the background and skills necessary to conduct sound and ethical research in their professional fields and successfully navigate through academic research relevant to guiding and improving criminal justice policy and practice. The capstone requirement consists of a mini-research proposal.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • CRM 706 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice

    Prerequisite: admission to the MS in Criminology or the MS in Administrative Studies with the Criminal Justice Option.

    This course is an in-depth examination of issues and methods involved with gathering data for research in crime and justice. Topics include research design, measurement, sampling, and analysis techniques.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • CRM 715 Leadership and Management in Criminal Justice

    Prerequisite: admission to the MS in Criminology and Criminal Justice; or Criminal Justice Leadership and Management certificate program; or Master of Professional Studies program with the Criminal Justice option.

    This course familiarizes students with theories, issues, and innovations related to leadership and management in criminal justice settings. Students are exposed to techniques aimed at enhancing leadership and management capabilities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • CRM 720 Crime Theory and Policy

    Prerequisite: admission to the MS in Criminology and Criminal Justice; or Crime Prevention certificate program; or Master of Professional Studies program with the Criminal Justice option.

    This course surveys various classical and contemporary theories of lawbreaking. The relationship between criminological theory and justice system policy is emphasized. A position paper on a theoretically-driven policy is required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • CRM 728 The Ethics of Justice

    The emphasis for this course is on ethical leadership and decision-making in the criminal justice system. Students will use the knowledge they've gained over their academic careers to critically analyze and discuss topics in criminology and criminal justice. The course will begin by examining ethical systems that can be used to justify and direct ethical judgement. Following this, ethical issues in policing, courts, corrections, and social science research will be discussed and debated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 730 Juvenile Justice

    This course aims to stimulate and facilitate critical and reflective thought regarding the legitimacy and effectiveness of juvenile justice policy and practice in the United States. Students analyze the mission and goals of juvenile justice systems, organizational design and managerial and staff roles, contemporary policies and programs, and methods of performance evaluation in juvenile agencies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 740 Foundations of Homeland Defense and Security

    This course provides an overview of homeland security and defense undertaken in the United States since September 11, 2001. The course provides students with the generally accepted knowledge required of homeland security professionals.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 741 Cybercrime and Cyber terrorism

    This course provides an in depth analysis of differences between cyber terrorism and cybercrime and the motivations that drive cyber criminals and terrorists. It also examines emerging strategies used by law enforcement and the private sector to respond to cyber attacks.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Summer, Upon demand
  • CRM 745 Topics in Homeland Defense and Security

    A comprehensive and integrated homeland security and defense strategy must also include the full range of elected officials, first responders, the human, animal and plant health communities, business and our citizens. This course will examine the application, progress and problems of the development and implementation of a homeland security/defense strategy.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 746 Global Criminology

    This course explores how the traditional field of criminology is being transformed by forces of globalization.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 747 Policing Terrorism

    This course examines the role of law enforcement in counter terrorism efforts in the United States. It explores law enforcement responses to terrorism from a critical, best-practices perspective and addresses controversial strategies employed by enforcement agencies responding to terrorism within the context of a democratic government.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 750 Contemporay Issues in Policing

    This course is a critical examination of contemporary issues in policing and considers the role of police, theories related to policing, police operations and strategies, public views about police, and outcomes of policing in the U.S.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 751 Applied Evidence-Based Practice in Policing

    This course examines the merits and limitations of research-informed policies and techniques utilized by law enforcement agencies to increase public safety and reduce crime. Topics will include hot spot policing, broken windows policing, CPTED, modern technological applications, focused deterrence strategies, predictive policing, problem-oriented policing, community policing, and other relevant evidence-based practices in policing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • CRM 765 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice

    This course introduces the student to the role of law and courts in the criminal justice system, with a particular focus on the relationship of the law to police investigatory procedures. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the United States Supreme Court in interpreting the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. Current legal issues in criminal justice will also be examined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 770 Correctional Theory and Practice

    This course examines social control responses to lawbreakers including the exploration of classical and contemporary theories and philosophies that have guided American correctional policy, both institutional and community based. Management implications related to policy are addressed.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 771 Contemporary Issues in Community Corrections

    This course examines modern issues, problems, and practices facing the community corrections profession. A special emphasis is placed on exploring the challenges of interacting with specific types of offender populations, including mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence offenders, in community and treatment contexts.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • CRM 772 Applied Evidence-Based Practices in Community Corrections

    This course reviews a range of research-informed policies, programs, and practices delivered to offenders in correctional settings to improve supervision and reduce recidivism. In addition to coverage of the relevant literatures, the course emphasizes hands-on applications of evidence-based practices through a variety of active-learning exercise.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • CRM 773 Offender Thinking and Decision-making

    This course explores how criminal offenders process and prioritize information when they encounter opportunities to violate supervision conditions and commit crime. Beliefs, values, and attitudes used to rationalize criminal behavior are also examined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • CRM 777 Crime Prevention in the Modern Age

    This course will be a survey of crime prevention methods and the theories associated with them. Particular emphasis will be placed on deterrence and routine activities. Students will use such theories to analyze past and present methods for crime prevention and the reasons behind their successes or failures. Research and policies for crime prevention will also be examined for both public and private industries.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 780 Gangs and Gang Policy

    This course explores the nature and scope of street gangs and critically analyzes gang-control policies and programs. A variety of gang-related issues are discussed, including the problems inherent in defining the term "gang," the historical development and organizational structure of gangs, and gang origination, persistence, desistence, prevalence, and migration. In addition, proposed solutions to gang problems are analyzed by examining such policies and programs as gang databases, gang prosecution units, gang enhancement statues, and civil injunctions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 785 U.S. Drug Control Policy

    This course provides a historical overview of the formulation, implementation and evaluation of U.S. drug control policy. The focus is on critically reviewing the cultural, social and political forces that have shaped our nation's drug control policies and assessing the research that has been conducted to evaluate the effects of such policies. Topics to be examined include prohibition, interdiction, eradication, legalization, law enforcement and military responses, effects on the criminal justice system, treatment, education and prevention.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • CRM 790 Graduate Practicum in Criminology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Faculty supervised experience in a criminology-related agency. Students are expected to work 45 hours in the agency for each credit hour. The practicum includes academic reflection on work experience at the agency. May be repeated for up to 6 hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • CRM 796 Independent Study in Criminology and Criminal Justice

    Prerequisite: admission to the MS in Criminology and Criminal Justice or the Master of Professional Studies program with the Criminal Justice option; and permission of instructor.

    Faculty supervised independent research directed by a member of the department graduate faculty. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when the topic varies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • CRM 797 Policy Analysis Capstone

    Prerequisite: completion of 27 hours in the MS in Criminology and Criminal Justice program, including the completion or concurrent enrollment in CRM 701, CRM 705, CRM 715 and CRM 720; and permission of a graduate faculty member.

    This capstone experience requires an in-depth analysis of a specific criminal justice policy with an emphasis on demonstrating an understanding of the policy (including its historical background and current applications), specifying strengths and weaknesses, and offering suggestions for future research and improvement of the policy. This course should be taken the last semester of coursework.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • CRM 798 Thesis I

    Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRM 701, CRM 705, CRM 715, and CRM 720; and permission of graduate thesis committee following the successful defense of an initial concept paper.

    This phase of the thesis process requires the completion and successful defense of a thesis prospectus, including statement of the problem, literature review, and methodology sections.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • CRM 799 Thesis II

    Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRM 701, CRM 705, CRM 715 and CRM 720; and approval of thesis prospectus by the student's thesis committee.

    This phase of the thesis process calls for the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data and the development of final conclusions and implications. The final product must be successfully defended in front of the thesis committee.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring