Biomedical Sciences Courses

Nurse Anesthesia (ANE) courses

  • ANE 700 Informatics and Graduate Studies for Anesthesia

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Study of the researcher role, research process, research skills, scientific writing, professional development, and research ethics. Study the use of technology in graduate studies. Dissect the meaning of a capstone project and its purpose.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 702 Clinical Conference I

    Review of significant cases involving complex anesthesia considerations.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 705 Clinical Conference II

    Prerequisite: ANE 702.

    A review of significant cases involving complex anesthesia considerations.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 708 Clinical Conference III

    Prerequisite: ANE 705.

    Continuing review of significant cases involving complex anesthesia considerations.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 711 Clinical Conference IV

    Prerequisite: ANE 708.

    Continuing review of significant cases involving complex anesthesia considerations.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 714 Orientation to Clinical Anesthesia

    Prerequisite: permission from program director.

    Introduction to anesthesia equipment, monitoring equipment, positioning, intravenous considerations, records, departmental management, ethics, departmental organization and function, legal and professional aspects.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 717 Physics and Chemistry of Anesthesia

    A presentation of the principles and laws of physics and chemistry applicable to the field of anesthesia.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 720 Basic Principles of Anesthesia

    A presentation of the principles of laws of physics and chemistry applicable to the field of anesthesia long with an in-depth analysis of structure and function of the cardiac, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, hepatic, renal, neurologic, autonomic, and central nervous systems.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 723 Application of Anatomy and Physiology to Anesthesia II

    An in-depth analysis of the special relationships between anesthesiology and the endocrine, hepatatic, renal, neurologic, autonomic, and central nervous systems.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 726 Introduction to Clinical Anesthesia

    Preoperative evaluation of patients, airway management, inhalation techniques, common complications of induction and emergence. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 732 Advanced Anesthesia Principles I

    Prerequisite: ANE 720.

    An in-depth review of drugs commonly used to provide the state of anesthesia, review of subjects essential to the practice of anesthesia; emphasis on pediatrics, neonatal, critical care anesthesia, trauma and burns, organ transplants and organ retrieval, obesity and GI disorders, and a study of the requirements for specialized anesthesia care; regional anesthesia, chronic pain, cardiac, and vascular anesthesia.

    Credit hours:
    6
    Lecture contact hours:
    6
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 734 Advanced Physical Assessment and Clinical Reasoning

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Advanced critical thinking, communication and diagnostic skills needed to obtain comprehensive and focused history and physical exams, analyze assessment data, generate differential diagnoses, evaluate and utilize screening and diagnostic modalities appropriately. An evidence-based practice framework will be utilized. Identical with NUR 734. Cannot receive credit for both ANE 734 and NUR 734.

    Credit hours:
    5
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    6

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 735 Clinical Practicum

    Prerequisite: admission to Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Clinical experience in the anesthesiology department at multiple clinical sites. Specialty content may be included as part of the practicum experience. May be repeated to a total of 44 hours. Hours are based on clinical practicum days in the clinical area. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    3-10
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 742 Clinical Physiology

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Clinical interpretation of organ systems with a consideration of disease etiology and diagnosis. Current research topics will be introduced and discussed.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    4
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 744 Pharmacology in Anesthesia

    Prerequisite: ANE 720.

    A review of the effects of drugs required by patients with preexisting medical conditions and their continuation in the perioperative period.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Summer

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 745 Anesthesia Pharmacology I

    Prerequisite: BMS 620.

    A study of the principles of clinical pharmacology and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of commonly used anesthetic agents during the perioperative period. A review of the effects of drugs required by patients during the perioperative period with and without preexisting medical conditions and their continuation in the perioperative period. Detailed study of inhalational agents and stages of anesthesia, opioids, opioid agonists/antagonists, barbiturates and non-barbiturates, and drug interactions.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    4
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 746 Anesthesia Pharmacology II

    Prerequisite: ANE 745.

    A study of the principles of clinical pharmacology and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of commonly used anesthetic agents during the perioperative period. A review of the effects of drugs required by patients during the perioperative period with and without preexisting medical conditions and their continuation in the perioperative period. Detailed study of neuromuscular blocking drugs, and local anesthetics. Course includes an introduction to autonomic pharmacology and cardiovascular pharmacology.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 750 Advanced Anesthesia Principles II

    Prerequisite: ANE 720.

    A review of the special anesthetic considerations for: anesthesia delivery systems, pre-operative evaluation, monitoring, professional liability, rare and coexisting diseases, hemotherapy and hemostasis, post-anesthesia recovery, minimally invasive procedures, orthopedic, geriatric, outpatient anesthesia, airway management, respiratory physiology and function, thoracic surgery, neuro surgery, patients with liver and kidney disease, acid-base disturbances, and patients undergoing urologic, ophthalmic, and otolaryngologic surgery.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    4
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 800 Leadership for Evidence-Based Practice

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Advanced critical thinking, communication and diagnostic skills needed to obtain comprehensive and focused history and physical exams, analyze assessment data, generate differential diagnosis, evaluate and utilize screening and diagnostic modalities appropriately. An evidence-based practice framework will be utilized. Cannot receive credit for both ANE 800 and NUR 800.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Summer

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 803 Human Factors and Patient Safety for Healthcare

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Examines healthcare from a safety perspective and how to facilitate change for caregivers at the "sharp end of the stick" according to the Reason theory of errors. Discussion of an environment and philosophy of safety. Explores basis of human error, patient safety and quality assurance by introducing a system approach, including crisis management, simulation and teamwork in healthcare. Course taught online only.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 806 Professional Practice in Anesthesia

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Emphasizes learning through advanced clinical experiences in anesthesia practice. Explores concepts of nurse anesthesia practice, competence and expertise, and incorporation of critical thinking skills and reflection as an evaluation method. The focus is on methods of determining best practice through identification of problems, review, and systematic evaluation of current research, interdisciplinary collaboration and consideration of economic and other factors that impact patient outcomes. A professional portfolio will be expected at the conclusion of the program. Course taught online only.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 807 Anesthesia and Healthcare Policy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Examines government and non-government issues that influence nurse anesthesia practice. Focuses on development of skills that contribute to leadership and personal effectiveness in implementing change in nurse anesthesia and healthcare. Emphasizes interdisciplinary relationships between the CRNA, nurse, physician, and administration, policy makers and other key stakeholders that format healthcare policy; equips the student with up-to-date information on various global health topics and perspectives; a basic perspective of health policy issues in different geographical regions, and explains how global health policy is affected by significant world events, including coverage of new infectious diseases with human rights, stigma of diseases and disclosure. Comparison of health and healthcare universally. Course taught online only.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Summer

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 810 Health and Wellness in the Healthcare Setting

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Health and wellness in the healthcare setting for the healthcare provider in modern day medical settings. Health coping strategies investigated. Pitfalls of stressors in healthcare with evidence-based solutions. Addiction and recovery for healthcare professionals reviewed with AANA wellness modules, and peer assistance as well as University assistance for students reviewed. Health lifestyles including dietary, mental, physical, spiritual wellness for healthcare providers discussed. Course taught online only.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 897 Research for Scholarly Project

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    The Capstone Project is the culminating experience of the DNAP program, and presents an opportunity for students to investigate a problem relevant to the practice of anesthesia. Because nurse anesthesia practice includes administrative and educational roles as well as clinical practice, the project is open to a wide variety of ideas and interests. Students are encouraged to be creative in identifying problems and suggesting corrective actions;, solutions must be based on sound evidence. ANE 897 and ANE 898 are consecutive courses to allow the student time to complete the Capstone Project during their anesthesia study periods. The initial class provides direction and approval for the class, while the latter class provides presentation and evaluation of the determined project. Course taught online only. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Projected offerings

  • ANE 898 Capstone Project Presentation

    Prerequisite: ANE 897 and admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    The Capstone Project is the culminating experience of the DNAP program, and presents an opportunity for students to investigate a problem relevant to the practice of anesthesia. Because nurse anesthesia practice includes administrative and educational roles as well as clinical practice, the project is open to a wide variety of ideas and interests. Students are encouraged to be creative in identifying problems and suggesting corrective actions; solutions must be based on sound evidence. ANE 897 and ANE 898 are consecutive courses to allow the student time to complete the Capstone Project during their anesthesia study periods. The initial class provides direction and approval for the class, while the latter class provides presentation and evaluation of the determined project. Course taught online only.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

Biomedical Science (BMS) courses

  • BMS 602 Special Topics in Biomedical Sciences II

    Prerequisite: permission of department head.

    Selected topics of an advanced nature which will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated by a student for a maximum of 8 hours of credit provided topics are different. May be taught concurrently with BMS 500. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 500 and BMS 602.

    Credit hours:
    1-4
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 614 Scanning Electron Microscopy

    An introduction to microsurface analysis using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. Theoretical considerations and laboratory procedures involve both techniques but the major emphasis will be on generation of secondary electron images. Some attention is devoted to backscattered electron imaging, X-ray mapping, stereo pair imaging, and related image processing techniques. May be taught concurrently with BMS 514. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 514 and BMS 614.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 616 Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Demonstration of basic transmission electron microscopy techniques and Microscope use. Emphasis is on ultrathin sectioning techniques; additional techniques include support film preparation, negative staining, immunogold localization procedures, and digital processing of photographic prints and negatives. May be taught concurrently with BMS 516 . Cannot receive credit for both BMS 516 and BMS 616.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    4

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 620 Medical Cell Biology

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Focus on the molecular aspects of cell biology for students in the Nurse Anesthesia program. Content identical to the lecture part of BMS 622. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 620 and 622. May be taught concurrently with BMS 520. Cannot receive credit for BMS 520 and BMS 620.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 622 Molecular Cell Biology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Origins, structure and function of cells and basic life processes from a molecular perspective. Major topics focus on the energy, chemical, and information exchanges within and among cells and their environment. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 620 and 622. May be taught concurrently with BMS 521. Cannot receive credit for BMS 521 and BMS 622. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    3

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 624 Virology

    Prerequisite: BMS 622.

    The molecular biology and pathogenicity of animal viruses; basic techniques of tissue culture and virology will be performed in the laboratory. May be taught concurrently with BMS 524. Cannot receive credit for BMS 524 and BMS 624.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 625 Molecular Biology

    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

    In-depth examination of nucleic acid structure, function, regulation, repair, and mutagenesis; principles of genetic engineering. Laboratory provides experience in the techniques used to isolate, separate, quantitate, characterize, and modify nucleic acids. The course also includes an introduction to the GenBank and EMBL nucleic acid and protein sequence databases. May be taught concurrently with BMS 525. Cannot receive credit for BMS 525 and BMS 625. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    3

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 628 Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

    Prerequisite: BMS 622.

    An in-depth study of the methods of genetic control and production of pathogenic factors employed by disease causing bacteria. The course will use both reference material and primary literature to illustrate the topics under discussion. May be taught concurrently with BMS 528. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 528 and BMS 628.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 629 Molecular Genetics

    Prerequisite: BMS 625.

    Recent advances in the molecular aspects of genetics; mammalian DNA will be characterized and manipulated using modern molecular techniques. May be taught concurrently with BMS 529. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 529 and BMS 629.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 631 Cell Biology of Cancer

    Prerequisite: BMS 622.

    Discussion of the initiation, cellular and genetic events which lead to cancer as well as its prevention, treatment, and personal consequences. An extensive paper and presentation are required. May be taught concurrently with BMS 530. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 530 and BMS 631.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 635 Signal Transduction

    Prerequisite: BMS 622.

    This course will examine the molecular mechanisms of various ligand/receptor interactions. The dynamics involved in ligand/receptor binding will be studied and examples of receptor-mediated signal transduction will be introduced. Signaling pathways within the cell will be discussed. Primary literature and reference materials will be utilized to illustrate specific examples under discourse. May be taught concurrently with BMS 535. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 535 and BMS 635.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 640 Biotechnology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    The applications of the methodologies of cell and molecular biology in the rapidly-evolving biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industries with an emphasis on the major sectors involving human therapeutics, human diagnostics, and genomics. Cell and molecular biology technologies adapted to mass production techniques to produce the products of biotechnology are surveyed. Typical pathways of product development from original basic research, product inception, clinical trials, regulatory approval, and commercialization are covered. Students will examine the current programs of the research and development of selected biotechnology and big pharmaco corporations. May be taught concurrently with BMS 540. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 540 and BMS 640.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 645 Clinical Gross Anatomy

    Prerequisite: admission to Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    The course offers in-depth coverage of basic, applied and clinical aspects of gross anatomy. An advanced musculoskeletal anatomy course that emphasizes the study of functional relationships between musculature, nervous tissue, vascular and skeletal components for the extremities and axial skeleton: Cadaver dissection laboratory experience is used to enhance understanding of three dimensional anatomical relationships for specific body regions. Students observe, discuss, teach, learn and dissect all body systems in detail. This course incorporate traditional didactic lectures, discussions, laboratory dissection, students teaching students (peer-teaching) in laboratory sessions and assignments that rely on critical thinking. Supplemental course fee. Identical with OTE 645. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 645 and OTE 645.

    Credit hours:
    5
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    6

    Typically offered: Summer

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 658 Recombinant DNA Techniques

    Prerequisite: C grade or better in BMS 625.

    A laboratory intensive course designed to extend the molecular biology principles and current techniques used in gene cloning, site-directed mutagenesis, transformation of eukaryotic cells, designing gene expression vectors, performing molecular hybridization techniques, confirming gene expression through reverse transcriptase PCR, and DNA sequencing. Supplemental course fee. May be taught concurrently with BMS 558. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 558 and BMS 658.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    4

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 660 Medical and Pathologic Physiology Laboratory

    Prerequisite: admission to MS in Cell and Molecular Biology Program.

    Experience using laboratory techniques and case studies to enhance knowledge of pathophysiology. May be taught concurrently with BMS 562. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 562 and BMS 660.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    0
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 661 Medical and Pathologic Physiology

    Prerequisite: admission to MS in Cell and Molecular Biology Program.

    A study of physiological dysfunction in human disease with consideration of disease etiology, diagnosis, clinical interpretation, and treatment. Designed for students and professionals in the health sciences. May be taught concurrently with BMS 561. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 561 and BMS 661.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 663 Advanced Work Physiology

    Review of cellular metabolism, energy transfer, and oxygen transport during work; excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle; physiological mechanisms of fatigue; neuroendocrine regulation of metabolism and other responses to work; environmental factors in work performance. Emphasis on molecular and cellular mechanisms and contemporary research. May be taught concurrently with BMS 563. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 563 and BMS 663.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 664 Molecular Endocrinology and Reproductive Physiology

    A detailed examination of the physiological, cellular and molecular aspects of human reproduction with particular emphasis on the endocrine aspects of reproduction. May be taught concurrently with BMS 564. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 564 and BMS 664.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 665 Human Cardiopulmonary Physiology

    Prerequisite: admission to MS in Cell and Molecular Biology program.

    A cellular and molecular study of human cardiovascular and respiratory physiology and related human diseases. Emphasis will be on the molecular mechanisms for normal and abnormal functions of the blood, the blood vessels, the heart, the respiratory tract, and the lung. Current research topics and results will be introduced and discussed. May be taught concurrently with BMS 565. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 565 and BMS 665.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 667 Physiology of Exercise Metabolism

    Introduction to the study of human metabolic and work physiology. Digestion, absorption, and metabolism of biologically important nutrients as they affect cellular energy transfer; mechanisms of energy transfer in cells during various forms of work; oxygen transport and utilization at the cellular and system level; factors modifying the efficiency of human work performance. May be taught concurrently with BMS 567. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 567 and BMS 667.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 668 Physiology of the Human Gastrointestinal and Urinary Systems

    Structure and function of the gastrointestinal and urinary systems including pathophysiology of common clinical conditions. May be taught concurrently with BMS 568. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 568 and BMS 668.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 669 Neurobiology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Study of the mammalian nervous system including anatomy and principles of function. May be taught concurrently with BMS 569. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 569 and BMS 669.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 670 Principles of Pharmacology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Recommended Prerequisite: BMS 622. Overview of the aspects of pharmacology including: pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics, drug selectivity, toxicity, metabolism, drug development, and drug regulation. Additionally, an overview of the major classification of drugs and their mechanisms of action will be presented. May be taught concurrently with BMS 570. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 670 and BMS 570.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 682 Embryology

    Recommended Prerequisite: human anatomy. A study of anatomical changes during early animal development with emphasis on vertebrates. Lecture emphasis is on the cellular and subcellular mechanisms that may explain normal development, especially with regard to fertilization and morphogenesis. Laboratory emphasis on the normal development of live and preserved vertebrate embryos. Meets the embryology requirements for students in pre-professional medical, dental, and allied health curricula, as well as any student requiring a background in embryology. May be taught concurrently with BMS 582. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 582 and BMS 682.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    4

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 686 Molecular Mechanisms in Animal Development

    An overview of the relationship between the anatomy of developing embryos and fundamental molecular mechanisms that generate this morphology, with an emphasis on vertebrates. Some invertebrate systems will be presented. Selected topics will include cell signaling during fertilization, gene activity in early development, cytoskeleton dynamics during morphogenesis, cell-cell adhesion, master pattern genes, and regulated cell death. May be taught concurrently with BMS 584. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 584 and BMS 686.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 688 Histology

    Microscopic structure of cells, tissues, and organ systems, with special emphasis on human tissues. Extensive laboratory experience with interpretation of structures in stained tissues mounted on microslides. Recommended for students in medical, dental, optometric, and other preprofessional curricula, medical technology, cell and molecular biology, and zoology. May be taught concurrently with BMS 585. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 585 and BMS 688.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    4

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 693 Bioinformatics and Biomedical Resources

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Use of biomedical source materials and methods of data access, selection, organization, and evaluation. May be taught concurrently with BMS 593. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 593 and BMS 693.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 700 Introduction to Graduate Studies in the Biomedical Sciences

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Study of the researcher role, the research process, and research ethics relating to the biomedical sciences.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 701 Research in the Biomedical Sciences

    Prerequisite: admission to MS in Cell and Molecular Biology program; and statistics: MTH 645 or BIO 650 or PSY 711 or PBH 730 or concurrent enrollment in statistics.

    Focus on research skills, scientific writing, and professional development.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 707 Medical Human Anatomy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Cell and Molecular Biology graduate program.

    This course offers an in-depth coverage of basic, applied, and clinical aspects of gross anatomy. Students observe, discuss, teach, learn, and dissect all body systems in detail. This course incorporates traditional didactic lectures, discussions, laboratory dissection, students teaching students in laboratory teaching sessions, and assignments that rely on critical thinking. Students make oral presentations and use the library and other sources of information (such as the Internet and our Computer Laboratory) to learn and teach applied gross anatomy. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    6
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    10

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 711 Microbial Genetics

    Prerequisite: BMS 622.

    Course is designed to investigate various aspects of microbial genetics using advanced laboratory techniques. Experiments may include DNA and plasmid isolation and characterization, mutagenesis, transformation, transduction and conjugation of bacteria.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 717 Medical Human Anatomy and Radiology

    Prerequisite: admission to the Physician Assistant Studies program.

    Regional study of the human body. Course will include lecture and laboratory activities including cadaver dissection, study of anatomic models, computer images, x-ray, CAT scan and MRI, and ultrasound imaging. Identical with PAS 717. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 717 and PAS 717. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    6
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    11

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 726 Advanced Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Focused or detailed consideration of advanced or timely topics in cell and molecular biology. May involve group discussion from another institution or represent individual study. Credit for BMS 726 may be given for electronic and distance learning courses available via the Internet with the approval of the cell and molecular biology faculty who will determine the credit hours and topic title. Variable content course. May be repeated up to 6 hours when topic varies.

    Credit hours:
    1-4
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 727 Human Gross Anatomy

    In-depth study of the gross anatomy of the human body in areas of interest relating to administration of anesthesia. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    3

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 728 Human Neurophysiology and Anatomy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    This is a blended course designed for a study of human neuroanatomy and neurobiology with emphasis on understandings of pain sensation and perception. Lecture is focused on fundamental structure and function of central nerve system and peripheral nerve system with respect to pain followed by understandings of its regulatory mechanisms and pathological pain. The lecture portion incorporated non-traditional online lectures and discussion in classroom. Laboratory offers hands-on learning opportunities with emphasis on pain-related Gross Anatomy and pain management. Students observe, discuss, teach, and learn about the human nervous system in a cooperative learning environment. Supplemental course fee.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    4

    Typically offered: Summer

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 730 Current Literature Topics

    Prerequisite: admission to MS in Cell and Molecular Biology program.

    A weekly forum of faculty and graduate students to discuss reports in the current literature from cell, molecular, and developmental biology. Participants are assigned to report on developments in their specialty or area of interest and provide background for understanding the basis and significance of the report to others in the group. May be repeated. Required each regular semester for full time students.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 732 Clinical Preventive Medicine

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    A review of current scientific evidence regarding effective screening tests and interventions to improve health status.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 742 Organ Physiology

    Prerequisite: BMS 620 or BMS 622 and admission to the Cell and Molecular Biology graduate program or Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice program.

    Course is the study of the human cardiovascular and respiratory physiology and related human diseases. Emphasis is on the normal and abnormal functions of the heart, lungs and vascular systems. Consideration of disease etiology, diagnosis and clinical interpretation of the cardiopulmonary and vascular systems. Current research topics will be introduced and discussed.

    Credit hours:
    4
    Lecture contact hours:
    4
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 752 Medical Physiology

    Prerequisite: admission to Physician Assistant Studies program or Doctor of Physical Therapy program or MS in Cell and Molecular Biology program.

    The study of biological function of the human organism. Emphasis will be placed on mechanisms and regulation using examples focusing on the field of medicine. Topics covered will include general cell function, neural, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and renal physiology and regulation of acid-base balance. The course stresses the interrelated functions of the body systems in homeostasis and builds on this knowledge to introduce how disease alters the homeostatic controls.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 784 Developmental Genetics

    Prerequisite: BMS 625.

    A study of developmental gene families, their expressions as related to the normal and abnormal development of form and structure, and their intrinsic and extrinsic regulation in various animal model systems, including humans. Specific gene-programmed and gene regulated mechanisms such as those regulating pattern formation, triggering cell differentiation, initiating regeneration (as it applies to specific tissues and organs), controlling apoptosis, and determining rates of cellular and organismal aging are included.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 785 Histology and Tissue Biology

    Prerequisite: admission to MS in Cell and Molecular Biology program.

    This course emphasizes the structure and basic function of all the major tissues and cell types in the human body. It includes normal cell and tissue morphology and the adaptations that occur as a result of various stimuli both normal and abnormal.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 797 Non-Thesis Project

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    In-depth study in an area of interest, culminating in a presentation of an extensive scholarly paper. Graded Pass/Not Pass Only.

    Credit hours:
    2
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 798 Research

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Application of the research process in the supervised study of a selected problem. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    1-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • BMS 799 Thesis

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Demonstration of the capacity for research and independent thought culminating in a thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    1-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

Dietetics and Nutrition (DTN) courses

  • DTN 740 Medical Nutrition Therapy I Practicum

    Prerequisite: admission to the graduate Dietetic Internship Certificate Program.

    This is the first of a two-semester course sequence providing field experience in patient/client nutritional management at various sites under professional supervision (37 hours per week). Emphasis will be on utilizing the nutrition care process in providing basic medical nutrition therapy to include at least diabetes, heart disease, lung disease and basic health promotion in an acute or clinical setting.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • DTN 741 Medical Nutrition Therapy II Practicum

    Prerequisite: admission to the graduate Dietetic Internship Certificate Program.

    This is the second of a two-semester course sequence providing eight weeks of field experience in patient/client nutritional management at various sites under professional supervision (40 hours per week). Emphasis will be on utilizing the nutrition care process in providing medical nutrition therapy to include at least tube feeding, TPN, pre/post surgery patients in an acute or clinical setting with a research component required as part of the practicum.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • DTN 742 Public Health Nutrition Practicum

    Prerequisite: admission to the graduate Dietetic Internship Certificate Program.

    This course provides a six week field experience in the delivery of public health and community nutrition programs at local, state, national levels at various sites under professional supervision (37 hours per week). Current issues relating to the promotion of good nutrition and preventive health care will be examined. Students will evaluate nutrition components of various community health agencies and participate in the delivery of services.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • DTN 743 Food Service Management Practicum

    Prerequisite: admission to the graduate Dietetic Internship Certificate Program.

    This course provides a five week field experience (37 hours per week) practicing a systems approach to nutrition services management, including the human dimensions of management, management tools and techniques for assessing accountability, cost containment, productivity and marketing plans. Projects include development of a personnel and operational budget for nutrition services.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • DTN 744 Practicum in Area of Concentration

    Prerequisite: admission to the graduate Dietetic Internship Certificate Program.

    This course provides a six week field experience (40 hours per week) in either Public Affairs or Rural Health. Field placements and experiences will be developed with each student and the program director.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • DTN 745 Topics and Issues in Dietetics

    Prerequisite: admission to the graduate Dietetic Internship Certificate Program.

    This course provides a six week forum (3 hours per week) for topics pertinent to the practice setting and transition to professional practice. Topics of interest will cover areas such as managed health care, ethical decision-making, registration examination, charting, etc. May be repeated to 3 hours.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings